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Compare 07/17/2018

Tuesday, July 17, 2018    

Men of genius are often dull and inert in society, as a blazing meteor when it descends to earth, is only a stone.
  --Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, poet (1807-1882)

(101:7.4) A third group progress to the level of logical intellectuality but there stagnate in consequence of cultural slavery. It is indeed pitiful to behold giant intellects held so securely within the cruel grasp of cultural bondage.


     Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy and was one of the five Fireside Poets from New England.
     Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, which was then still part of Massachusetts. He studied at Bowdoin College and, after spending time in Europe, he became a professor at Bowdoin and later at Harvard College. His first major poetry collections were Voices of the Night (1839) and Ballads and Other Poems (1841). Longfellow retired from teaching in 1854 to focus on his writing, and he lived the remainder of his life in a former Revolutionary War headquarters of George Washington in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His first wife Mary Potter died in 1835 after a miscarriage. His second wife Frances Appleton died in 1861 after sustaining burns when her dress caught fire. After her death, Longfellow had difficulty writing poetry for a time and focused on translating works from foreign languages. He died in 1882.
     Longfellow wrote many lyric poems known for their musicality and often presenting stories of mythology and legend. He became the most popular American poet of his day and also had success overseas. He has been criticized, however, for imitating European styles and writing specifically for the masses.
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Compare 07/12/2018

Thursday, July 12, 2018    

The theory of democratic government is not that the will of the people is always right, but rather that normal human beings of average intelligence will, if given a chance, learn the right and best course by bitter experience.
   --W.E.B. Du Bois, educator, civil rights activist, and writer (1868-1963)

(71:2.1-6) Democracy, while an ideal, is a product of civilization, not of evolution. Go slowly! select carefully! for the dangers of democracy are:
    1. Glorification of mediocrity.
    2. Choice of base and ignorant rulers.
    3. Failure to recognize the basic facts of social evolution.
    4. Danger of universal suffrage in the hands of uneducated and indolent majorities.
    5. Slavery to public opinion; the majority is not always right.
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Compare 07/09/2018

Monday, July 09, 2018    

Through others, we become ourselves.
  --Lev Vygotsky, psychologist (1896-1934)

(25:8.4) Mortals come from races that are very social. The Creators well know that it is "not good for man to be alone," and provision is accordingly made for companionship, even on Paradise.

(160:2.6) Many noble human impulses die because there is no one to hear their expression. Truly, it is not good for man to be alone.

(193:3.2) Have you not read in the Scripture where it is written: 'It is not good for man to be alone. No man lives to himself'? And also where it says: 'He who would have friends must show himself friendly'? And did I not even send you out to teach, two and two, that you might not become lonely and fall into the mischief and miseries of isolation? You also well know that, when I was in the flesh, I did not permit myself to be alone for long periods. From the very beginning of our associations I always had two or three of you constantly by my side or else very near at hand even when I communed with the Father. Trust, therefore, and confide in one another.

     Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky was a Soviet psychologist, the founder of an unfinished theory of human cultural and bio-social development commonly referred to as cultural-historical psychology, a prominent advocate for a new theory of consciousness, the "psychology of superman", and leader of the Vygotsky Circle (also referred to as "Vygotsky-Luria Circle").
     Vygotsky's main work was in developmental psychology, and he proposed a theory of the development of "higher psychological functions" that saw human psychological development as emerging through interpersonal connections and actions with the social environment. During the earlier "instrumental psychology" period of his career (1920s), he argued that human psychological development was mediated by signs that he viewed as the psychological equivalent of instrument use in human labor and industry. Later, in the "holistic" period of his career (first half of 1930s), Vygotsky was increasingly influenced by the systemic thinking of the scholars associated with German-American Gestalt psychology movement. It was during this period that he—under the influence of Kurt Lewin's "Topological (and vector) psychology"—introduced the vague notion of the "zone of proximal development" and identified play of young children as their "leading activity", that he understood as the main source of the preschoolers' development in terms of emotional, volitional and cognitive development. Vygotsky was also influenced by Dr. Maria Montessori.
     During his lifetime, Vygotsky's ideas were controversial within the Soviet Union. As early as in mid-1920s, Vygotsky was introduced in the West where he remained virtually unknown until the early 1980s when the popularity of the developmental psychology of Jean Piaget (1896-1980) among educators started to decline and, in contrast, Vygotsky's notion of the "zone of proximal development" became a central component of the development of new paradigms in developmental and educational psychology. A Review of General Psychology study, published in 2002, ranked Vygotsky as the 83rd top psychologist of the 20th century and the third (and the last) Russian on the top-100 list after Ivan Pavlov and Vygotsky's longtime collaborator Alexander Luria.
     The early 21st century has seen scholarly reevaluations of the popular version of Vygotsky's legacy (sometimes termed "Vygotsky cult", "the cult of Vygotsky" or even "the cult of personality around Vygotsky"), which is referred to as the "revisionist revolution in Vygotsky Studies".
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Compare 07/06/2018

Friday, July 06, 2018    

Although the connections are not always obvious, personal change is inseparable from social and political change.
  --Harriet Lerner, psychologist (b.1944)

(99:4.6) During the psychologically unsettled times of the twentieth century, amid the economic upheavals, the moral crosscurrents, and the sociologic rip tides of the cyclonic transitions of a scientific era, thousands upon thousands of men and women have become humanly dislocated; they are anxious, restless, fearful, uncertain, and unsettled; as never before in the world's history they need the consolation and stabilization of sound religion. In the face of unprecedented scientific achievement and mechanical development there is spiritual stagnation and philosophic chaos.

(195:10.1) Modern culture must become spiritually baptized with a new revelation of Jesus' life and illuminated with a new understanding of his gospel of eternal salvation. And when Jesus becomes thus lifted up, he will draw all men to himself. Jesus' disciples should be more than conquerors, even overflowing sources of inspiration and enhanced living to all men. Religion is only an exalted humanism until it is made divine by the discovery of the reality of the presence of God in personal experience.

     Harriet Lerner, Ph.D., (born November 30, 1944) is a clinical psychologist, a contributor to psychoanalytic concepts regarding family and feminist theory and therapy, and also, the author of many books written for the general public. From 1972 to 2001 she was a staff psychologist at the Menninger Clinic in Topeka, Kansas and a faculty member and supervisor in the Karl Menninger School of Psychiatry. During this time she published extensively on the psychology of women and family relationships, revising traditional psychoanalytic concepts to reflect feminist and family systems perspectives.
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Compare 07/02/2018

Monday, July 02, 2018    

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