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Art and Prose

2021-06-14 2:36 PM | Thomas
Art should be like a holiday: something to give a man the opportunity to see things differently and to change his point of view.

  --Paul Klee, painter (1879-1940)

(5:4.4) The domains of philosophy and art intervene between the nonreligious and the religious activities of the human self. Through art and philosophy the material-minded man is inveigled into the contemplation of the spiritual realities and universe values of eternal meanings.

(48:7.22)  Only a poet can discern poetry in the commonplace prose of routine existence.

(196:3.30) Art results from man's attempt to escape from the lack of beauty in his material environment; it is a gesture toward the morontia level.

(143:7.3)  Profound philosophy should be relieved by rhythmic poetry.

(195:7.15) Art proves that man is not mechanistic, but it does not prove that he is spiritually immortal. Art is mortal morontia, the intervening field between man, the material, and man, the spiritual. Poetry is an effort to escape from material realities to spiritual values.

    Paul Klee was a Swiss-born German artist. His highly individual style was influenced by movements in art that included expressionism, cubism, and surrealism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and eventually deeply explored color theory, writing about it extensively; his lectures Writings on Form and Design Theory (Schriften zur Form und Gestaltungslehre), published in English as the Paul Klee Notebooks, are held to be as important for modern art as Leonardo da Vinci's A Treatise on Painting for the Renaissance. He and his colleague, Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the Bauhaus school of art, design and architecture in Germany. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, and his musicality.

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